The Happiest Day of My Life

The installation involves the manipulation of both wedding photographs and videos which questions the nature of pre-packaged memories collected as proof and documentation of love, achievement, success and happiness.

There is little conjunction of truth and social reality.” Around us are pseudo-events, to which we adjust with a false consciousness adapted to see these events as true and real, and even as beautiful. In the society of men the truth resides now less in what things are than in what they are not. Our social realities are so ugly if seen in the light of exiled truth, and beauty is almost no longer possible if it is not a lie.” - R.D.Laing

The Happiest Day of My Life deals directly with the tension between memory and truth. If the camera only captures what we choose to remember, as opposed to capturing the true lived experience, the smiles and poses acted for the occasion can not be a true reflection of the present, nor of the happiness we will attempt to project in the future. The current wedding rituals in North-American society are a perfect example of this artifice of memory and its connection to image.

A great number of North-Americans regard their wedding day as a pivotal moment of their lives that is to be cherished and remembered forever. The gathered images of fixed poses, and the constructed memories resulting from pre-determined behaviors many couples struggle to maintain during their glorious “Disneyesque” day of matrimony, result in creating memories that were not lived, nor fully experienced.

The installation involves the manipulation of both wedding photographs and videos in order to question the nature of pre-packaged memories collected as proof and documentation of love, achievement, success and happiness.